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Glacier National Park
#1
I suppose I should start a thread for this film since I am 2/3 of the way there, just outside Spokane. 520 miles down; ~300 more to the park...at least 1500 more before the trip is complete.

UPDATE: Film data added.

Teaser trailer:




Glacier

Glacier is a an ongoing project documenting the "Jewel of the Continent"; one of the most beautiful natural wonders in the United States. Eschewing traditional facts & figures documentaries for a more personal evocation of the park, the film offers a unique perspective on the essence of Glacier. Additional footage of the park, narration and score will be added when filmed during upcoming trips.

Production

This first version of Glacier was shot at the end of June 2013 over the course of 5 days and features a variety of landscape and camerawork, including several driving shots, and an early morning time lapse which began around 4:30am along an alpine lake and concluded 3 hours later. Several hours of video were culled into the film shown for festival viewing over the course of the following month. Weather was at times inclement, but the park was generally on good behavior.

Film Details/Crew

Running time: 12:25 minutes

Location: Spokane WA, Glacier National Park

Produced, Directed, Filmed, Edited, Written and Narrated by: Jesse Widener

Music "The Living Physicist" by Dan-O at DanoSounds.com

Many thanks to the park for additional information.
Art and Structure design studio - www.artandstructure.com
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#2
800 miles on Thursday, another 2-3 hours to the park on Friday. Weather was difficult for much of the day, but some workable shots were acquired. Weather today was much better and we got out for some hiking...more tomorrow. I have a number of shots I am curious to work with when I get home. Until then I don't know what I have which works and what does not.

A Spokane night driving shot was a no go on Thursday due to a constant drizzle on my windshield, but I will try again Monday. This morning's sunrise time-lapse attempt was about a 4 out of 10. I could possibly raise it to a 6 in post, but will make another attempt or two first. Tonight's sunset time-lapse attempt is also a no-go due to excessive dreary cloud cover. I have a number of great driving shots, though some are marred variously in ways I could likely crop around and just lose the 1080 for 720 or something in-between if necessary.

A couple basic things learned thus far:

1. So many variables to overcome. I have even more respect for nature/landscape documentarians. There are any number of challenges which can be cleverly overcome when I am shooting photography, but the constant run and length of film takes away a lot of those work arounds. Always learning and improving. It will aid any future films.

2. An LCD viewfinder eye piece is indispensable outside, especially with the contrasts/dynamic range involved and ever changing light/brightness.

3. One spare battery is not enough. Often I am out hiking/shooting longer than I am in the car driving/charging. I had to conserve my shots on Friday. For this sort of project, I should have at least 2 spare batteries and a dual charger for the car.

4. For obvious practical reasons, I reach for the quickest setup. I've been grabbing my smaller/lighter tripod far more than the larger tripod with rail and fluid head because of size/weight/est-up time. Moving from shot to shot is just more fluid the quicker I am ready to shoot. I need to move my fluid head to the easier tripod though, to make better use of it.


Jesse Widener
Art and Structure design studio - www.artandstructure.com
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#3
(06-22-2013, 07:25 PM)Art and Structure Wrote: This morning's sunrise time-lapse attempt was about a 4 out of 10. I could possibly raise it to a 6 in post, but will make another attempt or two first. Tonight's sunset time-lapse attempt is also a no-go due to excessive dreary cloud cover.

Indeed, shooting a kick-ass timelapse is very difficult and time-consuming, taking both a lot of skill and a lot of luck coinciding at just the right moment in time. I hope when people see a really well-done time-lapse, they have an appreciation for just how hard it is to pull off! Probably not though, I bet a lot of people that have never tried it or aren't involved in photography imagine that you just have to point a camera somewhere interesting and select the "Make Art" option in the menu! Rolleyes


(06-22-2013, 07:25 PM)Art and Structure Wrote: 3. One spare battery is not enough. Often I am out hiking/shooting longer than I am in the car driving/charging. I had to conserve my shots on Friday. For this sort of project, I should have at least 2 spare batteries and a dual charger for the car.

Crap, if we'd thought of it, I could've sent at least 1 of my spare D600 batteries along with you, or even a spare D600. I'm stalled out on my time-lapse film for a few days anyway, waiting on interesting weather to shoot or for darker nights with less moonlight.

-Ryan
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#4
(06-22-2013, 08:04 PM)RNiemi Wrote: ...shooting a kick-ass timelapse is very difficult and time-consuming, taking both a lot of skill and a lot of luck coinciding at just the right moment in time.

Agreed. I also meant to remark in my initial post that the sunrise itself was a 4/10, not my results. I did get a much better sunrise which was itself a 7-8 out of 10, but I had some technical issues, so my results were less than that. However I am confident with some effort I can correct in post. I may post some frames later.

Quote:Crap, if we'd thought of it, I could've sent at least 1 of my spare D600 batteries along with you, or even a spare D600. I'm stalled out on my time-lapse film for a few days anyway, waiting on interesting weather to shoot or for darker nights with less moonlight.

Not a problem. I only ran into the issue on the first day in the park. The other days involved significant driving and a stay at a hotel which kept batteries ready to go.

I actually barely caught the full moon at the beginning of the time-lapse I am targetting for post and it should work excellent in context for what I have in mind, though I know yo are going for star fields in yours.


Jesse Widener
Art and Structure design studio - www.artandstructure.com
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#5
I've begun reviewing footage. The time-lapse looks very promising but will take some time to polish, so I am focusing on culling through video shots first. Looks great as 2.4:1.


Jesse Widener
Art and Structure design studio - www.artandstructure.com
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#6
Glacier footage narrowed down to ~2 hours. Finished film is expected to be 10-15 minutes.


Jesse Widener
Art and Structure design studio - www.artandstructure.com
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#7
Footage narrowed down to ~1.5 hours. Compressed and reduced still from one of the shots I am working on, attached (click it to open a larger version).

This scene was shot with the 20mm/f3.5 Nikkor...I am fairly certain I shot it at f8.


Jesse Widener


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Art and Structure design studio - www.artandstructure.com
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#8
Is looking like good stuff from the pieces I've seen so far! 2.4:1 for the win.
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#9
Thank you, Ryan. Narrowed down to 30-40 minutes, and teaser trailer in the works.


Jesse Widener
Art and Structure design studio - www.artandstructure.com
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#10
Teaser trailer added to first post. Watch in HD for the best experience.


Jesse Widener
Art and Structure design studio - www.artandstructure.com
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